Net Worth Update #2 – December 2016

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The start of a new month is upon us so it’s time for me to share my second ever net worth update. You can find my first update here.

I’ve already noticed that one of the benefits of tracking my net worth and posting it online is that it helps me keep track of the money I have in various accounts as well as track the progress I’m making in those accounts over time. I would encourage anyone who is interested in reaching financial independence to track their net worth, regardless of whether you post it online for others to see or not.

So without further ado let’s jump into the numbers!

Money Market Funds
Ally Savings Account $2,513     (+$1,701)
First Financial Checking Account $1,296     (+$788)
Total Money Market $3,809     (+$2,489)
   
Tax Advantaged Accounts
Vanguard Traditional IRA $2,172     (-$216)
Vanguard Roth IRA $3,483     (+$70)
Fidelity 401(k) $3,160     (+$1,385)
Total Tax Advantaged $8,815     (+$1,239)
   
Non-Tax Advantaged Accounts
Loyal3 Brokerage Account $2,073     (+$701)
Vanguard Brokerage Account $10           (+$0)
Total Non-Tax Advantaged $2,083     (+$701)
   
Liabilities  
Student Loans $1,000     (+$0)
   
Net Worth $13,707     (+$4,429)

Progress

From November to December my net worth jumped up by $4,429, which is pretty exciting! To be fair, I received 3 paychecks during November instead of the usual 2, which partially explains the significant increase in net worth.

Student Loan Situation

For those of you who saw my first net worth update from last month, you may have noticed that I still have that $1,000 student loan yet to be paid off. The reason for this is because I had planned on paying it off using a travel rewards credit card so I could earn some miles. So this past month I got the Chase Sapphire Reserve credit card but it appears I’m not allowed to use the card to pay off the loan.

I’m wondering if anyone has any experience paying off loans using a travel rewards card? Is this not allowed? I’m fairly new to the “travel hacking” space so I’m still navigating the open waters.

The good news is I am still a full time graduate student so there’s no interest accruing on the loan as of right now.

Fidelity 401(k)

This past month was also the first month I received my employer match for my 401(k) contributions. My employer matches a generous 6% of all my contributions. I have to say seeing that employer match show up in my account was pretty incredible. That’s free money. That’s amazing. 

Loyal3

My Loyal3 brokerage account also increased in value by over $700 this past month, mainly due to my contributions. Each month I invest $20 on the same day every month in 18 different high-dividend yield companies. I plan to let this account become my dividend account and steadily dollar-cost average invest into it over time.

Looking Forward

To those of you who think I might earn a ridiculous amount of money…I really don’t. I am a full time graduate student and I graduate next semester, so as of right now I’m still living at home with my parents. So my only expenses currently are a phone bill, gas, car payment, car insurance, and groceries. My parents don’t charge me rent so that is one major expense I’m fortunate to avoid.

I already know that once I graduate and move out next year my expenses will increase and my savings rate will decrease, so for the next few months I’m simply in high savings mode.

It’s encouraging to see the numbers in my accounts increasing at such a steady rate and I’m glad I have an audience I can share the numbers with. That’s all for this month’s net worth update, thanks for reading 🙂

2 Replies to “Net Worth Update #2 – December 2016”

  1. I’ve had some fun playing around with Loyal3 as well and think it’s a great app for anyone who wants to play with individual stocks. It’s totally free, so no problem with that here!

    For the $20 a month that you’re investing in 18 different high yield companies, does that mean you’re putting $20 into a different stock each month? (i.e. Month 1 you invest in stock A, month 2 you invest in Stock B, and so forth and so forth).

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